scarletfall

What are you reading now?

425 posts in this topic

Books glorious books!

 

Here discuss what you're currently reading, recommend or request something, share your literary adventures, post bookshelf or library porn, show off a collection (show me your collections dammit), and generally have lots of bookish fun! :D

 

tumblr_lkck1ikwsH1qj7pz0o1_500.jpg

 

My future haus. :happy:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Goodreads has become one of my favorite websites in the past year or so, I read people's reviews on all the books I finish, I keep track of what I'm reading & when I finish it, and it's also encouraged me to read more when I set my 2011 reading goal to 40 books in a year. I completed that a few weeks ago because I counted graphic novels like The Walking Dead and Fables which made me feel like I cheated a bit, but even excluding those, I've read 30+ books this year which isn't amazing, but also isn't bad.

 

I'm currently juggling a few books:

Atonement by Ian McEwan - I'm about 2/3rds through this one and I'm loving it. The writing is absolutely beautiful, I can see why the film was so gorgeous, it's like they read how McEwan wrote and said, "Alright, let's make this one of the most beautiful films ever." The story is a little...eh, though. I have some problems with the romance, it feels like Romeo & Juliet in that the author just expects the audience to believe that in a single day, the two realize they're madly in love with one another and are destined to be together. I can buy that Cecilia realizes her feelings for Robbie, but it just feels a little too much like the author wants us to see their relationship as this sweeping romance that is tragically interrupted by Briony and it's just hard for me to swallow that. Otherwise, it's a great read so far. I've seen the movie so I know what will happen with the story, but I'm enjoying the writing so much that I barely notice it.

 

Your Presence is Requested at Suvanto by Maile Chapman - This is a bit of a weird book, it's set in this isolated town in Finland at a hospital and told mostly through the point of view of an American nurse named Sunny. The hospital is more of a long-term care facility where women of various ages come to stay either because they're ill or their husband died, but there's just something a little "off" about the facility. I'm only about 50 pages in (out of 260-something) so I don't have a really good grasp on where all of this is going yet, but the back of the book says: "One late-summer day a new patient arrives on Sunny's ward and soon Suvanto's reliable calm begins to show signs of strain. As summer turns to fall, and fall to a long dark winter, the escalating menace of Maile Chapman's astonishing debut novel builds to a terrifying conclusion." I've read mixed reviews on this from what I could gather from spoiler-free reviews. Some people said they had a hard time reading it because of the writing, but so far I've found the writing to be quite good and not particularly difficult, while others have said it's very good. Either way, I read about it in another book that suggested novels and authors based on where the book was set and the author said that having the book set in Finland gave it a really eerie and lonely feeling, and I've certainly felt like that's already somewhat present so I'm keeping my hopes up with this one.

 

On the subject of libraries, though, this is our current set-up in the living room/dining room of my house. :D I love it. :wub:

 

a1ab4151872f4aeaad949c7329b01ec5_7-1.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alas, my poor books can't be shown off to their best advantage due to a distinct lack of space. My antique ones are in a lovely glass-fronted cabinet in the living room but my other books...they're divided between two book shelves and six boxes. It's the only reason I'd ever consider marrying into the aristocracy - all those big country houses have massive libraries, which I covet more than (almost) anything and I could fill the shelves in a heartbeat. Plus it means I could pretty much live in said library and have meals etc brought in - a definite bonus if your husband turns out to be horrific. "I'm not marrying him for his money, I'm marrying him for the library at his country estate" is going to be my future battlecry, methinks... :giggle:

 

@ LG - Aww, I loved Atonement! It's one of the few Ian McEwan books I've ever been able to finish and I agree with you about the beauty of the prose. And I'm jealous of your 'library'. :)

 

In the New Year I'm going to be embarking on my "A Song of Ice and Fire" epic re-reading session, which should preoccupy me for months what with all the notes I'm going to have to take, but I've just finished reading two of the most beautiful, heartbreaking books I think I've ever read. The first one is "The Language of Flowers" by Vanessa Diffenbaugh and I swear I've never cried so much at a book in my life. It's just so beautiful - it's about the love between mothers and daughters, and between lovers, and friends...it's just brilliant.

 

The second one is called "The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake" by Aimee Bender and it's slightly weird but also beautiful. It follows a young girl named Rose who, when biting into a slice of her mothers lemon cake on her birthday, suddenly finds she's able to taste the emotions of the person who prepared the food - be that the sadness of her mother in the cake or the feelings of the worker who picked the lettuce in her sandwich. As she grapples with this odd condition Rose starts to look into the strnage history of her family as well as its tangled presence, including the mystery of her brother, Joseph. It's like a modern day fairy story for grown-ups and the ending was just like a sucker-punch, it was so completely unbelievable an yet, in the context of the novel, it fits really well.

 

Not sure what to read next...Ulysess by James Joyce has been calling me for months now but it's a bugger to read - not sure I have the temperament at the moment to concentrate on it!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've really wanted to start reading the Song of Fire and Ice books, I haven't seen Game of Thrones but I really want to get into both the show and the books, I think I'll add the first two or three books to my Christmas list to start me off with.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LG, It's Song of Ice and Fire! :nono: It may be a bit hard to get into at first, but, if you do... Honestly it makes Tolkien look like a 5th grade fanfic writer. Actually, this series may have actually ruined reading for me. It's that damn good that every other book I've read seems unbelievably trite by comparison. I don't know if you've ever read a book that actually changed your definition of what a good book should be (and if you have, please tell me, because I'd be very interested in checking it out). Many of the books I used to actually enjoy, I just can't stop thinking about how flawed they are and I can only see them as mediocre or passable at best.

 

Like, before, I was a huge Stephen King nerd, but now, most of his stuff looks very weak. A select few, like "Misery" still hold up, because that is one damn good psychological thriller right there. I still kind of like "The Stand", but goddamnit the man just can't write satisfying endings to save his life.

 

The only book that still holds up as a masterpiece in my opinion is "1984". I don't think I'll ever be able to praise it enough.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha, sorry about that. post-84-125168357274.gif Is Song of Fire and Ice a Rhapsody of Fire song? It seems familiar to me... post-84-125168357274.gif

 

When it comes to books that are so good they make you feel like everything else is inferior, I go through phases like that, but it's never like, "This is the best piece of literature I've ever encountered, every other writer needs to just give up!!" - it's more like, "Now I'm only in the mood for a book exactly like this but any other book that tries to imitate this style/plot isn't as good." It happened when I read the Harry Potter series (and sometimes I still go through a phase where I just feel like rereading Harry Potter because I'm suddenly in the mood for it and every other book I'm currently reading becomes boring until I get Harry Potter out of my system). I also went through that when I started reading Carol Goodman, a mystery writer who writes so beautifully it's unreal, especially the first book of hers I read, The Lake of Dead Languages, which is still probably in my top 10. It's about a Latin teacher who returns to the boarding school she went to as a teenager where her two best friends and the twin brother of one of the friends died, and as the year goes on, some of her students start dying. It explored a little bit of the psychology behind self-harm, particularly cutting, teenage suicide, and the fascination of these teenage girls with mythology, sex, and drugs. It was such a good book, especially for 15-16 year old me who was going through a phase with dyeing my hair black and just getting into bands like Evanescence and Nightwish, and I remember thinking I was so unique and this book featured girls just like me who liked hair dye and jewelry and ancient Greek mythology. Although I've definitely read better literature, that book still holds such a special place in my bookworm heart that whenever the subject of books that had an impact on me, I have to bring it up. post-84-125168357274.gif

 

Speaking of Stephen King, though, I just read The Mist yesterday for the first time after meaning to do it since some time last year when I saw the movie - the very first Stephen King movie that's actually decent, IMO. post-84-125168357274.gif I had read reviews saying that they thought the ending wasn't satisfying (not like the film's was either, I thought the book's was positively joyful compared to the film's ending), but I actually really enjoyed it. I think it helped that I read it on a foggy day while I had the whole house to myself so it was really quiet; I really got into the atmosphere of the book because of it, especially every time I glanced out the window and saw the fog rolling across the football field by my house. post-84-125168357274.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm reading A Dance with Dragons (book 5 of A Song of Ice and Fire) and in case people don't know, I'm totally and utterly obsessed. Its more than a "goodread" its an AMAZING read th_Happy_505.gif

After I finish this, I will hopefully have my hands on the last book of the Inheritance Cycle (as in, Christopher Paolini's Eragon series), titled "Inheritance"..... THEN after THAT I shall continue reading the 2nd book of John Jakes' North and South trilogy ahhhh so much reading :wacko:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@LG - I love those shelves. Reminds me of Ikea.post84125168357274.gif

 

Right now I'm reading Lady Q, a non-fiction about a former female gang member's life in the Latin Kings/Queens (for class, but still interesting), and a really silly teen series about a group of high school girls whose clique leader is killed, that shall not be named.post84125168357274.gif

 

I was at Barnes & Noble the other day and they had the Song of Icy Fire set and I was thinking about buying it... as I was standing in front of it I actually thought "all those forum fangirls can't be wrong, can they?"post84125168357274.gif So after I'm done with my current pile I think I'll at least get the first one in the series.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was totally smitten on Diana Gabaldon's "Outlander"-series. In fact, it got so bad, I find it hard to even get started on another novel...

 

Can anyone maybe recommend me some things? (I've got Martin's "Game of Thrones" in my bookcase, but I can't bring myself to read it, because it got badly tainted by the person who gave it to me... Maybe I'll ever get over it, then I'll get started on it, but not for now)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, fairylady, what are you most intersted in? If you're after fantasy, Robin Hobb and China Meiville are two authors you pretty much can't go wrong with. Robin Hobb was my favourite fantasy writer for ages and now comes second only after Martin. Her first two trilogies, The Farseer trilogy and The Liveship Traders are my favourites. China Meiville's Bas-Lag series is awesomeness, and the novels Un Lun Dun and The City & The City are great starting points to his other fiction.

 

Hmm, others. Kobo Abe is an amazing Japanese author (and Haruki Murakami but come on EVERYONE must have read Kafka on the Shore and Norwegian Wood by now), ANYTHING by Charles De Lint (esp Widdershins and Greenmantle) and Jack Vance. Guy Gavriel Kay's The Fionavar Tapestry (and everything else), Patricia A. McPhilip (Riddle-Master and The Forgotten Beasts of Eld), Tanith Lee's Tales of the Flat Earth, and Susanna Clarke's "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norell: A Novel" is fantastic. Then there is the new 'fantasy constitution' so to speak of authors who all popped up around the mid-late noughties to rave press reviews and mixed reader reviews. These be Joe Abercrombie, Patrick Rothfuss, Scott Lynch, R. Scott Bakker, Steven Erikson and Glen Cook. And probably a few more I'm forgetting/don't know of.

 

I loved Patrick Rothfuss's Name of the Wind, because A; it's great, and B; it has all these paralels with Harry Potter that makes me get slightly squishy over it but they aren't prevalent enough in the plot/characters for it to detract from my enjoyment of it. Of Joe Abercrombie's 'The First Law' series I've only read the first two books, but found them enjoyable as well, and I do intend to get the rest. It's got a similar kind of grit (and nastiness) Martin's universe has, but the characters, prose and plot can't measure up. Scott Lynch's 'The Lies of Locke Lamora' I have mixed feelings about. It's not bad, and the prose and plot are efficient but it doesn't seem to realise the full potential the author obviously has. Then again, it is a debut so hopefully the future holds much more for us.

 

R. Scott Bakker's 'The Prince of Nothing' series has as many mixed reviews as a book could get, but I personally think it's fantastic. It's not got much 'fantastical' about it but I found it really engrossing and almost like a psuedo-history with lots of interweaving political and religious compexities. I've yet to get my hands on his latest books. Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen on the other hand, takes a fairly large commitment (ten books long) but if you can get into it it'll repay in kind and then some. Erikson is a fantastic world-builder, I think at a level with Martin, and his prose is fantastic as well. Glen Cook's Chronicles of the Black Company are also fantastic, gritty fantasy books, very easily enjoyable.

 

Lastly I would like to apologize if I've just ranted at you about books you've already read (I don't know!) and if this kind if thing is completely NOT to your taste. I have Diana Galbadon's Outlander, but I haven't gotten to it yet. :sad: And lastly lastly, you simply MUST read A Song of Ice and Fire, seriously just go and buy yourself a new copy. I assure you you will not regret it. You too Los. :P

 

And now in the final part of this post, I must say I am obsessed with Virginia Woolf. I love love love love her books omg. The Waves and Mrs Dalloway are so beautiful it's ridiculous. Also, Alessandro Barico's little books, especially Silk, have recently amazed me beyond words. Silk is just so... gah I don't even know. It's amazing.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scarletfall, I'm open to a lot of things. As long as the writing speaks to me, I don't really care what kind of story it is.

 

Thank you so much for going through the trouble of writing such a long post, I've taken notes and will surely attack some bookstores in the next few weeks :). So the "ranting", well, I asked for it :P.

 

The "outlander"-series is just great, it's so well written, it's so humorous, and heartbreaking, and pagetearing, it's just... gah :D

 

About Game of Thrones:

 

It was given to me by my ex-bf in the ending days of our relationship. There were a lot of deeper issues, but one of the things that he always did, was making fun of things that I liked. If all you ever hear is how "ridiculous" or "stupid" everything you like is, well, you start to question how he values you as a person, too. One of the symptoms of that behavior, was that he never ever gave me a present for my birthday/christmas/our anniversaries, that I really wanted. I don't expect to get big and spectacular presents, I don't care if it only just costs 1 euro, as long as it shows that he knows that it's something I'll like and is happy that I'm happy with it. Once, he asked me what I wanted for my birthday, and I said that there were a couple of CD's on my wishlist, so that he maybe could pick one from that list. Didn't matter which one, I wanted them all anyways, so he couldn't miss. He didn't want to, because "it's metal, and I don't spend my money on metal".

 

So far for a little background. So, we were going on holidays together, and a few weeks before we were leaving, he spontaneously gave me the "song of ice and fire" by George Martin, since I was into the Gabaldon-series so much. I was thrilled with the present, because it finally showed that he wanted me to have something that I like, despite his opinion of it. While I was still completely on that high, I overheard him saying to a friend of his that he gave me the book "so that he'd have some peace and quiet while he was reading his own book". I think I could literally feel something break inside of me. So that was a little like the final drop... Well, one of the final drops. We didn't last much longer after that.

 

So, I'm ashamed to say that this is 4,5 years ago, and I don't care for the guy anymore. But the memory of not being able to look in a mirror for months after the break-up, is still a wee bit too fresh, I'm afraid. I never felt that small and insignificant in my life, and the book is connected to that. I might come to rebel against that jerk spoiling a perfectly wonderful experience for me, but I'm not there yet.

 

This isn't really a place for this, hence the spoiler.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, Fairylady, that's awful. Your ex sounds like a total jerk who needs a good mule kick - I'm not surprised you don't feel like picking Ice and Fire up just yet. *hugs* It's worth reading for sure, but I completely get why you wouldn't.

 

And yay, Outlander series!! I love that one too - although I'm heartbroken that Jamie is a fictional character :giggle: I keep hoping I'll wake up one day and find he's actually real, but till then I keep reading...

 

If you like fantasy stuff, you should try reading the Kushiel books by Jacqueline Carey. They're a bit more 'adult' than some, but they're brilliantly written and the story is just gripping. And Robin Hobb is also excellent, as scarletfall said. And Susannah Clarke. But yeah, I'd add 'Kushiel' to your list - the first one is Kushiel's Dart.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*hugs Fairylady* That is awful. I understand why you would be hesitant about the books then. Being around someone, let alone in a relationship with someone who belittles and dismisses your interests and passions is soul destroying. You should point me in that guys direction so I can give him a good smack on the nose. But I really hope you can come around to them some time, don't let some horrible person ruin such a wonderful thing for you forever.

 

And ksjd the Kushiel Books. Actually Jaqueline Carey in general. I dunno, I really can't get into her books and writing. Well actually I'll remedy that statement, I've only read Kushiel's Dart and the main reason I finished it was because I can't stand leaving a book unfinished. I don't know if it's because I hate Phedre, whom I found to be an intolerable Mary Sue that Carey couldn't make me care for, and I absolutely loath her plotted relationship with Melisande which was used as an infuriating plot device in parts of the book. I was also severely pissed off that the only two characters I found remotely likeable and interesting were killed off so early in the book. Not cool.

 

And the writing... I suppose because I couldn't get into the story I only found it syrupy and pretty and at times purple. When it comes to fantasy, especially this kind of high fantasy that is driven by world building and plot/character development, I generally demand the writer use a more plain prose style. It just doesn't work for me I suppose, I can appreciate the ideas there but I really don't like the excecution and what resulted from it. :( :( :( :(

 

But, still add it to the list I would say, it's a potentially very enjoyable book and what I've got to say about it shouldn't be taken too seriously. :P

 

I am also going to move Outlanders much further up my to read list now. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*hugs back Nocturna and scarletfall* Thank you, dear ladies. I have dealt with him 4,5 years ago, and I'm happy now, so that's all that counts. The book is kind of a last remainder of ghosts past, I suppose. I know I shouldn't let him get in the way of this, but I've learned that I can't rush things like this, and I know that one day, I'll stumble upon the book, and think to myself "just read it already, you stupid woman", and then I'll read it, and totally love it, and come on here and fangirl frantically about it to you guys, and you'll all be like "what the hell is she still talking about", and yeah :P

 

I read the "Kushiel"-series by Carey years ago, and I can't remember the details of it, but I know I enjoyed reading them. Maybe I should pick them back up in a while, and read the following series about Imriël, too. But I should learn not to re-read things before I've read some new things first, otherwise I just keep on reading the same books...

 

@Nocturna: I know! Jamie is a great character (my current bf reminds me a little bit of him, actually :P), but I also adored Claire... How she's so vulnerable and caring and sweet, but at the same time so very strong, willed, stubborn and short-tempered. She sounds like she'd be an amazing friend to have... So, scarletfall, I hope you'll enjoy the series as much as we did!

 

On another topic: yesterday, I discovered that there was a movie made out of the Roald Dahl book "The Witches". I used to adore his books as a child, I read "The Witches", "James and the Giant Peach", "Matilda", "The BFG", ... I think I'll add them to the re-read-list as well, but in English, this time. I find myself buying books in their original language more often recently, anyway :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last book I read was Lady Of The Rivers by Phillipa Gregory, which is a wonderful book. Before it was Catherine Of Aragon: Henry's Spanish Queen by Giles Tremlett, which is a biography. There is something fascinating about Catherine, and I was hooked by the first page. When you actually stand at the tomb of someone who seems like a fairy tale, it feels very strange and sobering and sad to know that they are there, beneath the stone of a cathedral floor, when in your mind they still seem alive.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently reading "I En Förvandlad Stad" (In A Transformed City) by Per Anders Fogelström. The fourth book in his series about working class life in Stockholm between 1860-1968 that follows the same family, generation after generation. This book covers the period from 1925-1945.

 

It's fantastic so far, just like the other three were. It's one of those series every Stockholmer should read in their lifetime.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I cleaned up my bookcase this morning in an effort to do something useful, because everything was a little out of order. Now about 2/3? of my books are on it, the rest are still in my bedroom, in messy piles and boxes and... all over the place. It's not really fit to be shown. >.>

 

SO this is it atm,

tumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo1_1280.jpg

 

I'm missing Robin Hobb's newest books. Not pleased. Close ups!

 

tumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo2_1280.jpgtumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo3_1280.jpg

 

This be Harry Potter, LOTR and a few other fantasy. Most of the fantasy and sci-fi is in my room. But the Harry Potter books are all the first edition adult hardbacks, my mum got me the first 5 for my sixteenth I think. My kids books were falling apart at the spines, had pages falling out and were so broken and battered for all the times I'd read them. It was so weird, I was amazed that she'd gotten them for me, but I just couldn't bring myself to read them haha. I couldn't abandon my old books and I felt so apathetic about them for ages, but I'm reading them now for the first time, and my old books are being safely kept in a box. And may very well follow me into my grave. :P

 

In the second we have the hallowed ASOIAF collection. The 1st edition hardback of ACOK is at my dad's house atm, I leant it to him on a sworn oath under pain of death that it be returned to me in the exact condition I parted with it in. hehe. So A Game of Thrones to A Storm of Swords are all the American retail first editions on Bantam (that version of AGOT is soo ridiculously hard to get now, I'm lucky), and A Feast for Crows and Dance are Voyager, the UK/AU first editions. There is also the limited edition of AFFC there, that's signed and numbered. It's awesome. The UK 1st editions on Voyager of the earlier books are impossible to get now, and they're so bloody expensive when they do pop up. I think there is ACOK on ebay right now for $280 American. *shakes head*. And Fevre Dream is absolutely AWESOME. I must get his other books.

 

tumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo4_1280.jpgtumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo5_1280.jpgtumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo6_1280.jpg

 

Shakespeare, Murakami, Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte, Virgina Woolf and then Les Miserables, the greatest novel ever ever written in the history of human civilization. :P I love Les Mis. It's my favourite novel. I love it to pieces, I love it so much I don't know what to do with myself when I think about it.

Some cookbooks and Japanese artbooks are at the bottom. The cooking text books are in my room, and a few others. The one I cook from most is 'A Platter of Figs and Other Recipies' by David Tannis, because it is just so ***** fabulous. The 'Pizza Modo Mio' rocks to, awesome pizzas. The Cook's Encyclopedia was given to me as a gift with the best of intentions but it's really of no use to me at all. It isn't Larousse. When I said so (not rudely or at the time), I was asked why, and I said the book is simply for cooks, for home, not for chefs. It's completely different things. And my god the recipe for hollandaise sauce is horrendus and makes the most horrible runny yellow stuff that doesn't even remotely resemble hollandaise sauce at all. How is it possible to create a recipe so wrong for something so simple. O.o

 

tumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo7_1280.jpgtumblr_lwgdjhSPLB1r0c38fo8_1280.jpg

The Japanese books! These are the only books in my room remotely suitable to show off. Of the learning materials, Heisig's remembering the kanji course has been absolutely amazing. I'm currently about a 1/3 way through the second book, it's about 110 times more difficult than the first. ***** kanji compounds. The grammar dictionaries on the left are the best of their kind, and the kenkusha dictionaries on the top right have been helpful far beyond the call of duty. Especially the furigana dictionary, which makes learning how to interpret the different readings of kanji in context 1093u982gazzilion times less intimidating. And the kanji dictionary in the forefront, without which, I would be lost. :P Kyo's books of poetry are in black and white, and some other Dir en grey books. I can say I owe a lot of Japanese to Dir en grey. :P

 

So that't it for now! Most recent books I brought are The Secret Garden by Burnett and Le Petite Prince. I haven't read Le Petite Prince in so long I can barely remember it, so I'm very much looking forward to it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've seen the Swedish version of Girl Tattoo Dragon and I've just seen the American version of it last night, and suffice it to say, it was disappointed, although not surprised, at what they did to the character of Lisbeth Salander. I haven't read any of the books and I never intended to because translated books never 100% convey the original intent of the author and with these books I'd really want to understand where Stieg Larsson is coming from and exactly what he's trying to say, but now that I've seen both movies I'm really tempted to read at least the first book in order to better compare. My impression of Larsson's intent with Salander was that she was a girl who was so abused and damaged that normal human interaction was something she just wasn't capable of nor was it something that would ever occur to her. In the American version of the film she does a lot of "un-Salander" like things (based on my understanding of her character) like make Mikael breakfast, ask him for permission before doing something, etc. The movie also portrays her as more of a bratty kid than a damaged woman, and later on more playful and emotional than she ever was in the Swedish version. SO, to wrap this up, to anyone who's read the book, does she do those things in the book? Is the American movie as untrue to her character as I think it is? And are the books really as great as everyone says they are?tongue2.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So ... I love Downton Abbey (the TV series) ... I love the atmosphere the series convey and I love the costumes and all that. Does anyone know whether there are plans for Downton Abbey books? (as happens with very popular things, they usually get a wide range of merchandise stuff) I would love to read the drama going on in the mansion, so that I can absorb it better :)

 

About books I am currently reading (I often read many books parallel, depending on my mood): The White Oleander, Vampire Diaries - The Return: Shadow Souls, The Science of Anime, Death Note manga, Bakuman manga, Jane Eyre and probably some more that I forget to mention now. Some yet untouched books on my shelf: Stories from 1001 Nights and an informative book about Japan. Besides I am reading stuff for university about different advanced statistical methods and about models concerning collective decision making.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the American movie as untrue to her character as I think it is? And are the books really as great as everyone says they are?tongue2.gif

 

I've yet to se the American version and I've only read the first novel in the Millenium trilogy, but from what you're saying it doesn't sound untrue to me. I think you should definitely read the book to draw your own conclusions, but imo, Noomi Rapace gives a very harsh portrayal of Lisbeth. In the book we get into her head, and by the end I almost couldn't reconcile Noomi's performance with the character Larson draws in the book. Not to say I think her performance is bad at all, quite the contrary, but I found Lisbeth very different in the book. Though, I've still only read the first. I have to say, I'm extremely excited to see what Rooney Mara does with the character.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh FINE I'll get the book.grin.gif Yeah, I'd read just a couple things people had said about the American version and they were mostly along the lines of "Lisbeth would never let Mikael hold her like that", etc. It really seemed like Larsson's books are unique, and Rapace's character was certainly unique, Mara's less so however, so I tended to get the impression her personification was less accurate. The more I think about the Swedish version the more I love and appreciate it and its characters, and watching the Hollywood version so soon after it made it seem all the more... Hollywood-y, if that makes sense.tongue2.gif There were a lot of problems with the American version, I thought, but once I read the book I'll feel more qualified in my criticism and my understanding of both movies.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Scarletfall. You indeed have a very impressive collection!

 

I love reading books too, but since most of my books are in English so I encounter some understanding problems about cultural elements and implications every now and then.

 

Right now I'm reading simultaneously 2 book: "One Door Away From Heaven" of Dean Koontz and "Wuthering Heights" of Emily Brontë. I find the latter quite hard to understand even since the very beginning ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh FINE I'll get the book.grin.gif Yeah, I'd read just a couple things people had said about the American version and they were mostly along the lines of "Lisbeth would never let Mikael hold her like that", etc. It really seemed like Larsson's books are unique, and Rapace's character was certainly unique, Mara's less so however, so I tended to get the impression her personification was less accurate. The more I think about the Swedish version the more I love and appreciate it and its characters, and watching the Hollywood version so soon after it made it seem all the more... Hollywood-y, if that makes sense.tongue2.gif There were a lot of problems with the American version, I thought, but once I read the book I'll feel more qualified in my criticism and my understanding of both movies.

 

nrrr I really hope the American version lives up to the hype. David Fincher seems so perfecly suited to this material I wonder how it could go wrong. I saw the swedish film before I read the book, and when I first watched it I was incredibly impressed, I got the book straight away and read it, then watched the film again, and I didn't enjoy it half as much. I think the swedish version has it's fair share of problems as well, especially the latter two films. And because Fincher is re-adapting the book, rather than re-making the swedish film, I'm really hopeful that it'll be amazing. Or at least, better than the Swedish films ^^ But arrrrghhh if it's been very Hollywood-ised I shan't be too happy. :( And then... Daniel Craig hooooooooooooo :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, apparently I'm going to need a new series to obsess over in the near future. So, I want to ask those of you who have read Wheel of Time to give me some feedback on it (spoiler-free, naturally). From what I understood, this is a behemoth in terms of length and I'd like to get a few opinions before I invest in it. Like, how does it compare to LotR, for example, or ASoIaF? And alternate recommendations are welcome as well. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, man - Wheel of Time. The first books (like the first 3-4) are absolutely great, or at least I thought it was some of the best I had ever read back when I read it for the first time 10 years ago. Then it starts going downhill, the series just collapses under its own weight in terms of boring little sub-plots and a general lack of action. There's still good moments, though. Haven't read the newest books (after book 9 or 10) that came out in the last years after his death, I just can't get around to reading it all over again.

 

So it depends...the first books are great high fantasy, and then....it requires patience, to put it nicely. Maybe things have picked up again, I don't know. It is very different from ASOIAF in the sense that WoT is high fantasy with some of the clichees - "the one" who is meant to save the world, etc....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now