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hunebedbouwer

Deep Purple

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This UK band is mostly known for what probably is the most distinctive, original and classic song in hardrock/ heavy metal history: 'Child In Time'. Most music lovers will recognize the song after the first 5 notes and know the next 11 minutes will be full of fantastic singing, heavenly screaming and fast pace guitar playing.

I think it's such a wonderful song, that this band already deserves a mention on this forum, only for creating this epic piece of music. But ofcourse they composed a lot more interesting and good songs. Founded in 1968, they still play and release music up till today with only a long hiatus from 1976 till 1984, albeit with lots of changes and problems in their line-up.   

 

Their  generally acknowledged best line-up was from 1969 - 1973, 1984-1989 and 1992-1993 with Ian Gillan, Jon Lord, Roger Glover, Ian Paice and Ritchie Blackmore.   

Together with Black Sabbath & Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple have been referred to as the 'unholy trinity of British hardrock' in the early and mid seventies. They have produced 19 albums so far, of which 'Deep Purple In Rock' (1970) is by far the most known and well known. It also has the iconic cover of their heads carved out in rock at Mount Rushmore (USA) as a parody (?) on the real heads of 4 American presidents.

 

Deep-Purple-In-Rock.jpg    

 

For me personally, 'Child in time' is connected to the Dutch 'Top 100 of all times' (listeners could vote for songs) which was broadcasted from the pirate radio station 'Veronica' off the North Sea once a year, at night from 24.00 till 07.00 o'clock. Together with my sister, I listened all night and then, at about 06.50 the number 1 was played and in the seventies (it's still broadcasted) it was almost always 'Child in time'. Those are the memories I have, when I hear those first 3 notes: 'pam pam paaamm', just wonderful!!!   :music:  :music:  :music:  

 

Child In Time

 

 

 

When A Blind Man Cries

 

 

 

Smoke On The Water

 

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I think they are mostly known for the opening riff of Smoke in the Water :) . 

 

But yes, great and highly influential hardrock-band. Rock 'n' roll was never again the same after In Rock. And of course Jon Lord's (R.I.P) hammond-sound was legendary. 

 

They've gone through numerous line-up changes, but of course the most famous is that "Mark 2". Gillan, Blackmore, Lord, Glover, Paice. In Rock, Fireball, Machine Head. 

 

Of course back in the 90's Steve Morse joined the band and they made one classic more. The guitar work here is fantasic:

 

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@Harvest

Maybe my memories keep running away with me, blurring any objectivity and forgetting that magical riff. :)

 

Quite funny those periods are described as MARK I - IV, isn't it? 

In 1975 they got in the Guiness Book of Records for being the 'loudest' band on earth.

And then they make stuff like this:

 

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"Highway Star" and "Burn" (Mark III with David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes) are my two favorites of theirs.

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Quite funny those periods are described as MARK I - IV, isn't it? 

 

 

Mark I - VIII actually:

 

Mark I:

Rod Evans (voc), Richie Blackmore (gui), Nick Simper (bass), Jon Lord (keys), Ian Paice (drums)

Records:Shades of Deep Purple (-68), Book of Taliesyn (-68), Deep Purple (-69)

 

Mark II (the most famous one):

Ian Gillan (voc), Blackmore (gui), Roger Glover (bass), Lord (keys), Ian Paice (drums)

Records:In Rock (-70), Fireball (-71), Machine Head (-72), Who do we think we are (-73), Perfect Strangers (-84), The House of Blue Light (-87), The Battle Rages on (-93)

 

Mark III:

David Coverdale (voc), Blackmore (gui), Glenn Hughes (bass), Lord (keys), Paice (drums)

Records:Burn (-73), Stormbringer (-74)

 

Mark IV:

Coverdale (voc), Tommy Bolin (gui), Hughes (bass), Lord (keys), Paice (drums)

Record:Come Taste the Band (-75)

 

Mark V(nickname "Deep Rainbow", because of Turner):

Joe Lynn Turner (voc), Blackmore (gui), Glover (bass), Lord (keys), Paice (drums)

Record:Slaves and Masters (-90)

 

Mark VI:

Gillan (voc), Joe Satriani (gui), Glover (bass), Lord (keys), Paice (drums)

No records, touring lineup, because Blackmore left the band once more. 

 

Mark VII

Gillan (voc), Steve Morse (gui), Glover (bass), Lord (keys), Paice (drums)

Records:Purpendicular (-96), Abandon (-98)

 

Mark VIII

Gillan (voc), Morse (gui), Glover (bass), Don Airey (keys), Paice (drums)

Records:Bananas (-03), Rapture of the Deep (-05), Now What?! (-13)

 

So Ian Paice is the only original member. Everyone else has left or been fired some time during their history. Jon Lord left, because of health issues, though and they hired Airey to replace him. The returns of Mark II was forced marriege by the labels to bring in Gillan, who didn't really get along with Blackmore. Mark VI with Joe Satriani, was because they had to bring in a touring guitarist, since Blackmore left the band for the last time in the middle of a tourcycle. 

 

And they say Nighwish is always changing bandmembers :rolleyes:

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Harvest, I'm so  happy you're aboard this NW-forum ship to correct my faults. :giggle:  :good:  :friends:

When I remember reading the pop magazines in the seventies, Ritchie Blackmore always seemed to be the obnoxious one that wanted to have all his way and be responsible for break ups. Any thoughts on that? What I've found myself most of the time is, as soon the original line-up is changed, there's something of the band's magic gone. I can't name it exactly, but maybe it's more something of a feeling (for the fans). There are only a few bands that actually have improved with changes, let alone many of those.

 

Three songs from some of their individual careers:

 

Roger Glover - The Mask

 

 

 

Ian Gillan - One Eye To Morocco

 

 

 

Ritchie Blackmore - a bit of fun

 

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Harvest, I'm so  happy you're aboard this NW-forum ship to correct my faults. :giggle:  :good:  :friends:

 

You're welcome.

 

When I remember reading the pop magazines in the seventies, Ritchie Blackmore always seemed to be the obnoxious one that wanted to have all his way and be responsible for break ups. Any thoughts on that? 

 

To be completely honest, I think people in general love rockers, because they can be such *****. Rn'R has always been about big egos and Blackmore is one the best (or worst) of that bunch. And big egos always collide eventually. They don't call him the "the most difficult man in Rock and Roll" for no reason. On the hand, very talented guitarpalyer and musician, but he can certainly make it difficult for people in his bands. 

 

He wanted Glover out. Or he would go. The rest of the group gave in. He wanted Turner in (just because he didn't like Gillan) and the rest of the band gave in. After they pressured him to hire Gillan, Blackmore started acting like a child (he was sulking alone in dressing room without talking to other band members and didn't even come on stage on time) and left in the middle of a tourcycle. 

 

But then again. I think this has always been a part of rock and roll drama. Drugs, booze, fighting. And classic records, when they focus on their job. Van Halen bros against David Lee Roth, Slash vs. Axl Rose, Steven Tyler vs. Joe Perry, the list goes on and on. 

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'Hush' sounds like a combination of hardrock and the Monkees. Weird, though catchy.

 

 

 

'Highway Star' with some electrifying guitar playing:

 

 

 

'You Keep On Moving'

 

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A grande intro to and a fantastic cover of Jimi's song

 

 

 

Another cover. This one of Donovan's 'Lalena'. Hadn't heard this one before.

 

 

 

A bit of live showboating with keyboards and guitars on 'Wring that neck'.

 

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A remarkable thing happened in 2006: Don Airey's Hammond organ - such an integral part to Purple's sound - broke down.

 

So the guy had to make do with the rest of his rig for the evening.

 

There is a bootleg of it and it's... interesting.

 

 

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One of my all time favourite bands, and I was thrilled a couple of weeks ago to interview Don Airey who was a top guy in all respects.

As for Child In Time, yes it's a classic but let's not forget how heavily it borrowed from the song Bombay Calling by the band It's A Beautiful Day from the year before. (YouTube it ;))

 

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@Progatron70

Thanks for that info. Didn't know that. That it certainly a nice song and sure very psycheproggy. I read that they were allowed to do a 'Wring that neck'-version in return.

 

 

No matter where or how I hear those first notes, I'll Always get the shivers..............................

 

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